Podcasts

I used to think I was a visual learner, and then I discovered podcasts. I’m a complete podcast junkie, I listen to them on the way to and from work every day, and they are absolutely my favourite way to learn and stay current. I also make some as well.

The Google Educast

cover170x170The Google Educast is a weekly video podcast hosted by a talented group of Google Certified Teachers who discuss Google’s amazing tools and how they can be applied in your classroom. It’s always a fun conversation with lots of great news, tips and teaching ideas and as you can imagine, when you’re dealing with Google stuff there is always lots to talk about!

We use Google+ Hangouts to record the show and we were one of the first podcasts to get access to Google+’s Hangouts on Air technology.  As we record the show we also stream it live to an audience, as well as capture the whole thing to YouTube and Google+ for later playback and archiving on our website.

 

The Virtual Staffroom

VSRThe Virtual Staffroom was a community podcasting project I started in 2006. With the tagline of “Conversations with leading teachers about technology in the classroom“, the Virtual Staffroom aims to have, well, conversations with leading teachers about technology in the classroom. Pretty straightforward really.

The basic premise of the podcast is to capture some of those wonderful off-the-record style conversations that we teachers often have as we sit around the staffroom table at school. Of course, the staffroom table in this case happens to be Skype, the school happens to be the whole world, and these conversations are recorded so they aren’t really off the record any more, but you get the idea.

The show is no longer in active production but it’s still a great library of interviews on different topics around the theme of technology in education with some of the most amazing teachers from around the world. It really is quite a good listen, even if I say so myself.

 

Betchablog va Odiogo

Odiogo Button

Ok, this is a just bit of a novelty, but you can also have this blog delivered as a podcast thanks to a service called Odiogo. Each post of the blog is automatically converted to a podcast and read with a digital voice. It’s a bit mechanical, but reasonably listenable.